Welcome to all the Sam Claflin fans, this tumblr is linked to samclaflinfans.com [right now under construction], your daily source for everything Sam.

We are just four girls following Sam as he follows his dreams. Follow us for the latest updates on this talented actor. ♥

Disclaimer: Everything posted on SamClaflinFans is not owned by any of the members unless stated otherwise. If your content has been posted on our site please let us know and it will be taken down as soon as possible.
site [under construction] twitter instagram facebook youtube

Behind the Scenes of Love, Rosie [x]

Behind the Scenes of Love, Rosie [x]

It’s a gripping, provocative thriller with much to say about power and class in modern Britain.

 Cineworld Magazine about The Riot Club [x]


New Still and First Review of The Riot Club
Lone Scherfig was the perfect director to bring Laura Wade’s play Posh, re-titled The Riot Club, to the big screen.The film-maker needed to be well outside the UK film-making establishment — and nowhere near the Establishment.Scherfig was born in Denmark and still resides there, though she has made some movies in the UK, most notably An Education with Carey Mulligan.Wade’s play ran at the Royal Court Theatre and in the West End. It’s about an Oxbridge dining club and most people assume it’s about the ancient (and notorious) Bullingdon Club, whose past members include David Cameron, Boris Johnson and George Osborne.Evelyn Waugh told the world about Bullingdon’s often nefarious goings on, way back in 1928, in his novel Decline And Fall. Then (and more recently, too), dining rooms were trashed, and money handed over to cover the damage.Scherfig insisted that the club featured in her film, showing at the Toronto International Film Festival next month, is not the Bullingdon. Rather, it’s ‘inspired by a lot of those clubs’.In a way, that doesn’t matter, because Wade and the director have, gloriously, opened up the play and made it into a stonking, fascinating, first-class film. With honours. ‘I tried, we all tried, to make a nuanced film and not just a big cliche about rich boys,’ Scherfig told me.She wanted to find a way to make it feel that we, the audience, were sitting at the table with the characters. And she did it by making one of the students, Miles, the protagonist. ‘He’s one who at least tries to be better; or thinks he’s better,’ she said.The result is a movie that is much deeper than the play. Miles has a choice, and he chooses to do nothing. Which makes the film about moral issues, and not just the class system.Miles is played by Max Irons, giving the performance of his career. And the entire ensemble is excellent.Scherfig met her ten young actors for a reunion dinner at Bocca Di Lupo in Soho. Was the place wrecked?‘Everybody left in a very nice manner, and nothing was broken,’ she says.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2712691/BAZ-BAMIGBOYE-What-thriller-Bond-24-gets-big-revamp-scenes-bother-script.html#ixzz3990mvqYw

New Still and First Review of The Riot Club

Lone Scherfig was the perfect director to bring Laura Wade’s play Posh, re-titled The Riot Club, to the big screen.
The film-maker needed to be well outside the UK film-making establishment — and nowhere near the Establishment.
Scherfig was born in Denmark and still resides there, though she has made some movies in the UK, most notably An Education with Carey Mulligan.
Wade’s play ran at the Royal Court Theatre and in the West End. It’s about an Oxbridge dining club and most people assume it’s about the ancient (and notorious) Bullingdon Club, whose past members include David Cameron, Boris Johnson and George Osborne.
Evelyn Waugh told the world about Bullingdon’s often nefarious goings on, way back in 1928, in his novel Decline And Fall. Then (and more recently, too), dining rooms were trashed, and money handed over to cover the damage.
Scherfig insisted that the club featured in her film, showing at the Toronto International Film Festival next month, is not the Bullingdon. Rather, it’s ‘inspired by a lot of those clubs’.
In a way, that doesn’t matter, because Wade and the director have, gloriously, opened up the play and made it into a stonking, fascinating, first-class film. With honours. ‘I tried, we all tried, to make a nuanced film and not just a big cliche about rich boys,’ Scherfig told me.
She wanted to find a way to make it feel that we, the audience, were sitting at the table with the characters. And she did it by making one of the students, Miles, the protagonist. ‘He’s one who at least tries to be better; or thinks he’s better,’ she said.
The result is a movie that is much deeper than the play. Miles has a choice, and he chooses to do nothing. Which makes the film about moral issues, and not just the class system.
Miles is played by Max Irons, giving the performance of his career. And the entire ensemble is excellent.
Scherfig met her ten young actors for a reunion dinner at Bocca Di Lupo in Soho. Was the place wrecked?
‘Everybody left in a very nice manner, and nothing was broken,’ she says.

HQ Still of The Riot Club [x]

HQ Still of The Riot Club [x]

HQ Stills of The Riot Club [x]

HQ Stills of The Riot Club [x]

New stills of The Riot Club [x] | [x]


New still of The Riot Club [x]

New still of The Riot Club [x]

German Billboard of Love, Rosie [x]

More photos of Sam with fans [x] | [x]


Sam and Laura with a fan [x]

Sam and Laura with a fan [x]


mrsamclaflin: I love this little one #Rosie [x]

mrsamclaflin: I love this little one #Rosie [x]


Love,Rosie: International Release Dates

Love,Rosie: International Release Dates


The Riot Club will be presented at the Toronto International Film Festival in September [x]

The Riot Club will be presented at the Toronto International Film Festival in September [x]

EPIX Exclusive Catching Fire BTS Footage (thanks to QuarterQuell)